Education Readings April 13th

By Allan Alach

I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz

Individual Testing is Killing Teaching

‘And it lead to each individual child in every class being tested individually. Each child’s strengths can be identified, and the gaps they have can then be specifically targeted. Teachers knew what each child needed, and could pass comment on this first hand to their parents or caregivers, through the wonderful National Standard reports that were sent home twice a year. Great.

Except that it is unmanageable.’

http://bit.ly/2qlwzM4

Stop Relying on Teachers to Teach Our Kids to be Good People!

‘I’m a big fan of teachers. Trust me. I am one. So is my wife.

But speaking as a parent, we are asking our teachers to do things we should be doing ourselves. While teachers are glad to help with the development of students, it is not their job to teach our kids to be good citizens. Teachers should be the BENEFICIARIES of us teaching our kids to be good kids.’

http://bit.ly/2GNUN8B

‘Kids are born scientists’ – Siouxsie Wiles talks STEM and sexism

‘Kids are born scientists.

What differs between individual kids is whether they see themselves as able to have a career in science, and part of that comes down to whether they have seen people that look like them as scientists.’

http://bit.ly/2IIQMmy

What Happens to Student Behavior When Schools Prioritize Art

More wisdom from Sir Ken.

‘The arts classes gave the students fresh enthusiasm for learning, and the walls and corridors were soon covered with displays of their work, which itself created a more stimulating environment and sense of ownership by the children. “Kids do well,” Bott said, “when you design and build a school that they want to be in. Having great arts programs and athletics programs makes school an enjoyable place to be and that’s when you see success.”’

http://bit.ly/2HptOBB

“Another nail in the coffin for learning styles” – students did not benefit from studying according to their supposed learning style

The evidence that debunks learning styles is clear, so why do I keep reading teacher comments that reference learning styles?

‘Their findings, they write – especially when considered in the context of past research – “provide strong evidence that instructors and students should not be promoting the concept of learning styles for studying and/or for teaching interventions. Thus, the adage of ‘I can’t learn subject X because I am a visual learner’ should be put to rest once and for all.”’

http://bit.ly/2EDnWlh

Contributed by Bruce Hammonds:

The idea that we each have a ‘learning style’ is bogus — here’s why

Yet another article debunking learning styles. Got the message?

‘When I was at school, a fair amount of time was put into determining our “learning styles.” Teachers told us that some people learn better visually with pictures, whereas others retained information by reading or making notes. To be honest, I never worked out what mine was.

In a survey, 96% of teachers were found to believe in learning styles. But it turns out this theory is nonsense.’

http://bit.ly/2GFsvBv

How can we ignite the STEM spark at primary school

‘With the right approach, a teacher can have a positive and lifelong impact on how students think about science.

That’s why Dr Maeve Liston is on a mission to help teachers and parents to ensure that young students engage with science and technology at primary school, and develop problem-solving skills and scientific literacy that will stand to them no matter what they go on to study later.’

http://bit.ly/2uWvVua

Why ‘Follow Your Passion’ Is Bad Advice

‘In other words, follow your passion. There’s just one problem: “‘Follow your passion’ is dangerous advice.” That’s a troubling claim, but it comes straight from Cal Newport’s investigation into “the details of how passionate people like Steve Jobs really got started”, as well as what scientists say predict happiness and fuel great accomplishment.

Newport’s not alone. In recent years, a host of leaders, academics, and entrepreneurs have all come to the same startling conclusion: nearly everything you’ve been told about following your passion is wrong.’

http://bit.ly/2H2y7ox

An Expert’s View: Sir Ken Robinson

‘Your new book offers wide-ranging advice for parents as they try to manage their children’s education. If you had to choose one takeaway, what would it be?’

https://nyti.ms/2qdkng7

Personalized Learning Isn’t About Tech

‘The key is giving students the decision-making tools they need to shape their own learning experiences Personalizing learning doesn’t necessitate investing hundreds of dollars per child in expensive hardware or applications—but it does require an investment in people and in fostering relationships between them. This investment can be as minimal as a few simple changes in mindset and practice, ones that move away from personalizing for students and toward personalizing with them.’

https://edut.to/2ErgWHU

From Bruce’s ‘goldie oldies’ file:

Together principals can do it

‘It is time they added their collective voices to the debate and this is easiest done by groups of courageous principals, defining what is important, and sharing it with others. And what they decide ought to focus on the needs of their students and communities and not the whims of politicians. Principals are in an ideal position to see the pressures that parents and the wider community have to face up to. They know well that, “it takes a whole village to raise a child.”’

http://bit.ly/1fitsx8

The history of New Zealand’s TOMORROWS SCHOOLS and time for fresh thinking?

A major and well overdue review of the current provision of education in New Zealand has been announced. Cathy Wylie, one of the review team, researched the so-called “Tomorrow’s Schools’ back in 2012, and Bruce summarises her findings in the article. Prepare for change!

‘Cathy answers the questions: What was the real effect of ‘Tomorrows Schools’? Has the New Zealand Schools system improved as a result? And what changes are needed now to meet our expectations of schools?’

http://bit.ly/2vbrWKm

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